Our friends and clients of Key Business Advisors, The Brainary, have released a new children’s game which focuses on teaching human rights at a young age.  In a world that is more connected than ever before as a result of globalisation, this game could not be timelier.

Founder of the Brainary and creator of this new initiative says:

“In a rapidly changing world where values, mores, customs, and ethics are increasingly learned in the cloud and from non-traditional sources, often with materialistic and prejudice underpinnings, more than ever the understanding and practices of human rights seems not just relevant but essential for a well-functioning world.” Hugh Kingsley, The Brainary.

Children have an instinctive sense of fair play in which they witness passionate “that’s not fair” negotiations every day in the school playground. The creators of the Human Rights Game are hoping to build on that. The first aim of The Human Rights Game is to make a positive difference by teaching children and teens about their rights, freedoms and responsibilities as individuals and groups of individuals in educational settings.

The second aim of the game is to help students learn right from wrong in a rapidly changing world whereby mores, customs, ethics, and values are learnt from non-traditional sources often with materialistic and prejudice underpinnings. Much of the learning takes place though discussion, short storytelling and problem-solving.

Learning Objectives

The Human Rights Game is an entertaining and highly engaging educational game that addresses the following learning objectives:
  1.  Learn about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, its 30 Articles and its three underpinning pillars of freedom, equality, and dignity.
  2.  Learn how the 30 Articles and pillars of the Universal Declaration of Humans Rights relate to everyday life.
  3.  Develop an understanding of right from wrong in a variety of everyday situations based on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  4.  Develop an understanding that more than one solution may be acceptable in a variety of everyday situations involving the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  5.  Learn the importance and relevance of problem-solving when more than one salutation is acceptable in a variety of situations involving the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  6.  Develop an understanding that freedom and rights also come with responsibilities
  7.  Learn the importance and relevance of healthy rules and regulations in life

If you want to know more about The Brainary or the Human Rights Game, visit their website or download the PDF!